(too old to reply)
Journalist Bill Cameron
Bobcat
2005-03-12 17:57:44 UTC
Bill Cameron, the long-time CBC TV journalists who started in CBC Radio died
late last night of esophageal cancer, following long periods of "brutal
chemotherapy", according to a story in today's Globe and Mail. You need a
password, so here's the item in its entirety.

Saturday, March 12, 2005 Updated at 10:46 AM EST
Canadian Press

Toronto - Bill Cameron, the intellectually challenging and erudite broadcast
journalist who had a celebrated parting of the ways with CBC Television in
the wake of 1999 budget cuts, is dead.
He died around midnight Friday of cancer of the esophagus which had moved
into his brain and liver despite rounds of brutal chemotherapy, a CBC
spokeswoman said.

The veteran TV news personality was born in Vancouver in 1943.

He got his first break in broadcasting at CBC Radio in the 1960s as a
freelance journalist. He later served as an editorial writer and columnist
for the Toronto Star and as an associate editor at Maclean's magazine.

He appeared on Global TV as host of Newsweek for five years beginning in
1978. He was also an anchor on Toronto's independent Citytv before joining
CBC's news magazine program The Journal as a reporter, producer and
alternate host. He spent nine years there and during his stint he journeyed
to the United States, Britain and Jordan. He also reported from Mozambique
and Nicaragua. He was the show's final host when it signed off Oct. 30,
1992.
He then joined CBLT, CBC's Toronto flagship station where he anchored the
evening newscast, and won a Gemini Award for his efforts. In September 1995,
he joined Newsworld in Halifax as host of CBC Morning News, replacing Henry
Champ who was moving to Washington. In 1999, he moved back to Toronto to
host Sunday Report and daily newscasts for Newsworld and Newsworld
International.

He co-wrote The Real Poverty Report, a study of the plight of the poor in
Canada. Cameron also wrote plays and poetry, having been published by Random
House.

"He has a wealth of news experience and knows how to get the most out of a
story," Slawko Klymkiw, CBC-TV's chief programmer and former head of
Newsworld, once said.

Although once cited as a potential anchor of The National, in 1999 he had a
parting of the ways with CBC after being asked to reduce his workload and
his paycheque in the wake of major budget cutbacks.

Friends said he'd had it with indecision and narrow-mindedness at the public
broadcaster.

"I don't want to sound maudlin, but there's an awful lot of my life there,"
he said at the time. "I still believe in it and I feel a little homeless,
wandering around in the big, wide world."

He still considered himself a "CBC lifer" and declined to be outright
critical, but he did warn that the network was in danger of hemorrhaging
more good people.

He added that in the end his departure was as much a quality of life issue
as financial.

"Inevitably, you find that what you're doing for a major part of your day is
extremely silly," he said. "I've got enough silliness in the rest of my
life. I don't need it at work."

Cameron had had lucrative offers from the U.S. but within days announced
that he was taking a job as vice-president of communications at the
Toronto-based American Gem Corp., a sapphire marketer, which then changed
its name to Digital Gem Corp.

He also held the ethics chair at the Ryerson School of Journalism and
freelanced for the National Post.

Recently he was back on television, hosting the talk show (At)issue on the I
Channel, the fledgling digital tier service, but could not continue due to
his escalating illness.

He is survived by his wife, Cheryl Hawkes, a freelance journalist, and their
three children, two of them still in university and one in high school.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20050312.wbill0312/BNStory/Entertainment/
Dan Say
2005-03-13 20:38:55 UTC
Post by Bobcat
Bill Cameron, the long-time CBC TV journalists who started in
CBC Radio died late last night of esophageal cancer, following
long periods of "brutal chemotherapy", according to a story in
today's Globe and Mail. You need a password, so here's the item
in its entirety.
Saturday, March 12, 2005 Updated at 10:46 AM EST
Canadian Press
Toronto - Bill Cameron, the intellectually challenging and
erudite broadcast journalist who had a celebrated parting of the
----
And the CP story appeared in the Toronto Star but
with a Sunday appreciation cobbled by Antonia Zerbisias.

See also:
http://www.ryerson.ca/rrj/archives/1993/cameronsmr.html
The New Protocol of War
Reporters are now targets, just like the armies they cover
BY BILL CAMERON
Someone had to take Peter Brysky's camera home.
Peter Brysky was from Toronto; he was a free-lance stills
photographer who was killed at Karlovac in Croatia on October
6,1991. A team from the CBC's "The Journal" was in Croatia
covering the war at the same time, staying at the same hotel,
the Intercontinental in Zagreb. The hotel manager brought us
Peter Btysky's camera to take home to his parents. We made some
phone calls about Peter Brysky. The Croatian press office
said he was accredited to Associated Press in London, but AP said
no, he was a stringer, working entirely on speculation: no
official connection. AP knew nothing about him. He had been in
Croatia four days.
....
I was a relative baby in this crowd, and 1'd already reported
from war zones in Mozambique, the old Rhodesia, and Nicaragua.
The routine in that war was automatic: in the parking lot of the
hotel on the first morning of work a crew member ceremoniously
taped the letters TV on the side windows of the van. We trusted
this totem to protect us against everything but accidents and
mines, and in general it did -- in Nicaragua it was possible to
drive slowly from the Sandinista zone up the mountain roads to
the rebel positions, and do it nervously but in relative safety.

Now, the word among the journalists who cover wars for a living
is that the Yugoslavian war may be a model for conflicts in the
future. The technology is changing the relationship between wars
and war reporters, because the fighters and the audience are no
longer in different rooms. CNN, Sky News and other satellite
services broadcast our work straight into the offices of the
generals directing the battles. Word about the hostility of the
Western media gets to the gunners very quickly.
....
You learn about combat journalism by doing it, by travelling
with people who know more than you do and learning the very rough
rules.
You learn to judge the risks you must take to get a story, the
risks you should take to make the story better, and the risks you
should reject even though your ego is pushing you into the line
of fire.
Some of the rules apply to one war only. In Rhodesia, if you
found the road filled with sheep or cows you were smart to
reverse and get out fast-it was likely a roadblock, the start of
a kidnapping or an ambush. And you didn't drive across dirt that
had drifted out across the road: the drift could hide mines.
Some of the rules are general. Don't get caught between the
lines; stay with one army or the other. If you're in a village
and notice the children have vanished, something's up so get
under cover or get out of the zone.
Now there are new rules for working in Yugoslavia, issued by the
Committee to Protect Journalists, an international organization
based in New York City. Travel in groups with at least two cars,
in case one breaks down. Don't cross into Serb-held territory if
your car has Croat plates. Don't mark TV on your vehicle: that
may draw fire. Don't ride in the backseat of a two-door car-too
hard to get out. If things look especially dangerous, drive
slowly with your car door open so you can ditch fast. Watch your
lights at night. If you're shooting video, drape the camera so
nobody can target the blue glow leaking from the eyepiece.
The old neutrality is over; journalists are now targets, just
like the people they're covering. Most reporters who haven't been
in combat look forward to it a little, expecting that it will
make them feel....

=====
and an interview just after he left the CBC
X-URL: http://www.ryerson.ca/rrj/archives/2000/murthaspr.html

Last June, I was stunned to learn of Cameron's resignation from
the CBC. I read the official statement that contract negotiations
had fallen through and he had accepted a fabulous new job as vice
president of communications for Digital Gem, but it didn't make
sense.
Seeing Cameron give up broadcasting was like seeing Gretzky hang
up his skates. It shook my faith in the profession. So on
Remembrance Day last fall, I took the subway to Cameron's new
Eglinton Avenue office


The events that caused the 57 year old to resign as host of CBC's
Sunday Report had been set in motion months earlier. Cameron had
received a final contract offer that cut his salary by 25 per cent
and increased his workload. "I don't know of anyone who could
have accepted it with any self-respect," Cameron says of the
offer. He chose instead to leave not just the Mother Corp., his
professional home for the previous 16 years, but the profession
as well.

With typical Cameron wit, which I had noticed surfacing on-air
less frequently in recent years, he downplays his decision as
being of minor consequence to the world of broadcast journalism.
"I think the country will survive," Cameron deadpans.

But in reality, his decision was a blow felt not just by CBC
viewers like me, but by those who worked with Cameron throughout
his career and saw the anchorman's departure as an unsettling
example of journalism that is more about style than content.
.....
=====
Dan Say
2005-03-13 20:42:44 UTC
Post by Bobcat
Bill Cameron, the long-time CBC TV journalists who started in
CBC Radio died late last night of esophageal cancer, following
long periods of "brutal chemotherapy", according to a story in
today's Globe and Mail. You need a password, so here's the item
in its entirety.
Saturday, March 12, 2005 Updated at 10:46 AM EST
Canadian Press
Toronto - Bill Cameron, the intellectually challenging and
erudite broadcast journalist who had a celebrated parting of the
And the Zerbisias apprciaciation in the Toronto Star

Toronto Sunday Star Mar. 13, 2005. 08:44 AM

[050313_cameron_bill_200.jpg]
One of Bill Camerons colleagues called him a triple threat
consummate anchor, journalist and writer. Valerie Pringle recalls
a softer side the guy who wrestled her for the chance to
interview Big Bird.

Cancer claims admired journalist

[8]ANTONIA ZERBISIAS, MEDIA COLUMNIST

The wonder is, Bill Cameron did not author his own obituary.

For here was a man who is acknowledged as the greatest writer
of his generation of Canadian journalists, whose words graced the
page, the stage, the screen, the classroom and, of course, the
airwaves.

Cameron, 62, died at his Toronto home just after midnight
yesterday, after a 20-month struggle with esophageal cancer,
surrounded by his wife, Cheryl Hawkes, and his children Patrick,
22, Rachel, 21, and Nick 15.

"He was trying to hold us in his arms," said Hawkes yesterday.
"But he was too weak."

Respected, admired, and loved, Cameron was, what friend and former
CBC colleague Fred Langan called yesterday, "a triple threat,"
the consummate anchor, journalist and writer.

But he was more than that.

From his start as a freelance entertainment critic for CBC and
CTV, to penning an editorial column at the Toronto Star at the
age of 25, to editing for the nascent Global news, to anchoring
at Citytv in the 1970s, to covering foreign assignments and
co-hosting for CBC's nightly newsmagazine The Journal, to
anchoring CBC-TV's local news, to fronting Newsworld's morning
show, to writing novels and ghosting documentary scripts for
others, to playing the anchor on the Comedy Network's Puppets Who
Kill, there was no journalism job Cameron could not do and do
well.

"Who the hell is good at all those things?" asked Mark Starowicz,
the producer who hired Cameron in 1983 to report and fill in as
an anchor on CBC's The Journal and Midday.

Which is why, when the Journal went off the air in 1992, it was
Cameron, tapped to succeed the late Barbara Frum as host, who
delivered the eloquent goodbye to viewers: "I'd like to leave you
with the words you find on the back of the cheque you get at any
coffee shop in Canada. Thank you for letting us serve you."

What Cameron had was a voice, and even at the end, when he could
barely use it, he still slapped on his make-up to host his
i-channel talk show, as well as act as fill-in interviewer on CBC
Radio's As It Happens.

His last big interview was with the Dalai Lama, for the
documentary The Dalai Lama: The Power of Compassion that aired
last week on i-channel.

"He was a master of the interview," said CBC's Peter Mansbridge,
who recalled Cameron giving him some pointers last fall at a
party in his honour.

About 200 friends and colleagues, from all the networks and the
print media where Cameron had worked, gathered at CBC to show
their support

"He really kept his sense of humour," said Global's Peter Kent.
"He'd go through the chemo sessions and was brutalized by them
but then he'd come up for air and talk to friends and inquire
about others."

"Everybody has this idea that he was such a serious guy," said
Valerie Pringle, with whom he worked on Midday. "But I remember
when the pportunity came up to interview Big Bird, he wrestled me
to the ground and said, `It's mine.'

"I can remember he was doing an interview, with a cop or
something, and he said, `Well, I've shoplifted, I've smoked
dope,'" Pringle laughed. "We all just dropped our coffees."

What Cameron cared about was his family and journalism.

"He worshipped his wife and children," said Pringle, describing a
Valentine's Day tribute that Cameron had published. "It just made
you cry. I thought this guy was so madly in love with Cheryl, I
can't even stand it."

In fact, it was love at first sight.

Hawkes met him in 1980, when she was doing a freelance profile on
him for Star Week magazine.

"He followed me out of the restaurant and tried to talk me out of
writing the story," she said yesterday. "He said `I don't need
publicity; I need to marry you.'"

They were wed four months later. But he would leave her often to
take on dangerous assignments for CBC, flying in and out of the
hellholes of the world.

Starowicz described one assignment in which Cameron was talking to
the camera, with bombs exploding around him, but he barely
flinched.

In fact, "he was talking in perfect paragraphs."

But it seems that Cameron, who has held the journalism ethics
chair at Ryerson University, also worried about the ethical
hazards of war reporting.

As he wrote in 1990, "That's the dreadful suspicion: That we dip
into the surface of deep events, paddle with our feet, guard our
comforts, patronize our contacts, exploit great tragedies for the
good of our careers, and get the story wrong."

Cameron wanted to get the story not only right, but also exactly,
perfectly, precisely right.

"He had one of the most discerning ears," said Citytv's Mark
Dailey, who worked with Cameron when he was the anchor of the 10
p.m. newscast. "He was a very important part of our early
conscience at Citypulse."

Mansbridge remembered one evening co-hosting with Cameron on the
Journal. It was a time of intense rivalries between the National
and the newsmagazine and few people expected the pairing to go
well.

But, said Mansbridge, in the middle of a technical interview on a
financial story, Cameron slipped him an idea, which improved the
segment.

"That underlined that this was a guy who cared about the product,
who cared about how we did things," Mansbridge said.

"He studied acting which is one of the reasons he could be a
little arch on television," Langan said. "He knew how to
manipulate words more than the average announcer."

A journalist to the end, Cameron documented his battle with his
cancer for an upcoming feature in Walrus magazine. His most
recent piece was a witty look ... at caskets.

That's why it is so surprising he didn't leave some notes for the
occasion of the death, one he knew was coming much too fast and
too soon.

http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?pagename=thestar/Layout/Article_P
rintFriendly&c=Article&cid=1110669012304&call_pageid=968332188492
Dan Say
2005-03-13 22:00:06 UTC
CBC's radio obit by Marsha Lederman
http://www.cbc.ca/clips/rm-audio/lederman_tw050312.rm
Real audio 2 min 23 sec.

CBC's TV obit
http://www.cbc.ca/clips/rm-lo/birak_cameron050312.rm
Broken?

CBC put up some archives on their home/news pages
http://archives.cbc.ca/IDC-1-69-1596-10955-11/that_was_then/life_society/bill_Cameron
--text at Archive site --

"Veteran broadcaster and writer Bill Cameron has
died at the age of 62.
Cameron was known as a trusted broadcaster with
a gift for humour and dry wit, as can be heard in
this 1977 radio clip. The new movie Network - a
biting satire on the TV news business - is making
a big splash with the public. As an anchor for
Global TV, Cameron gives a tongue-in-cheek personal
take on what Network has done to sully the
reputation of his profession."
----- -----
The same archive page has, as its second item, a search of
the archives which pulls up 37 links in some format that my Linux
machine doesn't decode automagically. (Windows media? Certainly
not Unix/Linux, OGG or other program type that will last)
http://archives.cbc.ca/270s.asp?typeRecherche=Ressources&selectListe=A-D&selectRecherche=285&IDLan=1
Bob Haberkost
2005-03-15 12:07:48 UTC
"Bobcat" <***@hotmail.com> wrote in message news:s4GYd.35694$***@news20.bellglobal.com...

| Toronto - Bill Cameron, the intellectually challenging and erudite broadcast
| journalist who had a celebrated parting of the ways with CBC Television in
| the wake of 1999 budget cuts, is dead.
| He died around midnight Friday of cancer of the oesophagus which had moved
| into his brain and liver despite rounds of brutal chemotherapy, a CBC

I'm sorry to hear this, certainly. I had the good fortune to have met Mr
Cameron at the last of the Second Harvest Christmas Carol readings at
Yorkminster Church on Yonge Street. Although he didn't look particularly ill, I
see in the articles since that he was already fighting this back then, as his
esophageal cancer had been diagnosed by then. Asking him to contribute to a
project I was working on (a Canadian Flag with the signatures of a number of CBC
notables) he signed it, along with his name, "Draw near at thy peril, American
wolf!" and then asked me if I knew who said this, and on what issue. I had to
admit then that I didn't know (and have since forgotten, so if anyone does,
please refresh my memory) but he told me that it was a Prime Minister (Borden?)
who distained American hegemony. Clearly and proudly Canadian, he certainly
was, but obviously, from where I sit, Bill Cameron was world-class.
--
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Men born to freedom are naturally alert to repel invasion of their liberty by
evil-minded rulers. The greatest dangers to liberty lurk in insidious
encroachment by men of zeal, well-meaning but without understanding." -- Justice
Brandeis
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
For direct replies, take out the contents between the hyphens. -Really!-
Dan Say
2005-03-16 03:25:23 UTC
The longer formal obit in the Globe,
(written by a Ryerson student?)

BILL CAMERON, JOURNALIST AND TEACHER 1943-2005

'Thinking-man's anchor' who was one of public broadcasting's true
believers seemed destined for greatness until 1999 when he was
among CBC staffers cut by corporation number crunching,
writes JOE FRIESEN
By JOE FRIESEN
The Globe and Mail
Monday, March 14, 2005 Updated at 10:10 PM EST

On the day he had brain surgery, Bill Cameron, ever the
consummate newsman, roused himself from the anesthetic to set the
record straight. He had already started an argument with the
nurses for taking his books away, and wasn't supposed to be
reading or doing anything strenuous. But as he lay there, his
head bandaged, listening to his neurosurgeon discuss the day's
news, he couldn't help but interject to fill in the missing
details.

"They were discussing something that had happened that day, and
Bill seemed to know all about it," his wife Cheryl Hawkes said
yesterday. "I said, you've been under anesthetic all day. How did
you do that? How do you keep up like that?

"Somehow, he must have read the paper."

Originally from British Columbia, Mr. Cameron spent his
high-school years in Ottawa. His father was a prominent
oceanographer and his mother died of cancer when he was a
teenager. He attended the University of Toronto from 1962 to
1965, and spent much of his energy as a young man trying to forge
a career as an actor and writer.

He got his start in journalism doing freelance work for CBC
radio, and at 25 was on the editorial board of the Toronto Star.
In 1970, he was part of a breakaway group that wrote the Real
Poverty Report in response to what they felt was a misreading of
the situation by the Senate Committee on Poverty.

He moved to Maclean's magazine before eventually being hired by
Global television in Toronto. Bill Cunningham, who was
vice-president of television and current affairs at Global, said
Mr. Cameron came highly recommended. "I've often wondered if by
taking him into television I didn't do him a bit of a
disservice."

"It's not the kind of thing you win Pulitzer prizes for, turning
out copy for an anchor, but he sure did it better than almost
anyone I've ever seen," he said. "He could really turn a phrase."

By the mid-1970s, Mr. Cameron had established himself in
television, becoming a reporter and anchor for Global at a time
of ambitious expansion at the station.

In 1978, Moses Znaimer at the upstart CityTV was looking to add
some intellectual weight to his newscast. He leapt at the chance
to hire Mr. Cameron, who brought a natural gravitas with his
Walter Cronkite-like delivery.

"Because we had the only 10 o'clock newscast [in Toronto], I
wanted to make it more dignified, and Bill was perfect," Mr.
Znaimer said. "Bill was a guy who believed that ideas matter and
who believed that wrapping up the day's events in a pithy and
elegant way was worthwhile."

It was not long after that Mr. Cameron met Ms. Hawkes, a
freelance journalist. It was Aug. 15, 1980. She had been assigned
to write a profile of the handsome, broad-shouldered anchor.

They met at the Blue Angel restaurant, and as she left at the end
of the interview, Mr. Cameron chased after her and said "I don't
need a profile written about me. I need to marry you."

Later, he told her that he knew from the moment they first spoke
on the telephone that he would ask her to marry him.

A few days after the interview, she watched him on TV, looking
for material for her story. She remembers seeing one of the short
editorials he used to do at the end of the newscast. That night,
he talked about his experiences at summer camp.

"I thought he was handsome, smart and really weird," she said. "I
was just intrigued, I guess. He represented everything I thought
I wanted in a partner."

It was a whirlwind romance. They were married four months later
in December, 1980. The profile Ms. Hawkes submitted was published
in Star Week the day of their wedding.

Mr. Cameron left CityTV in 1983, after station executives decided
his formal style was no longer a good fit for the hip urban
market they coveted.

He was snapped up almost immediately by Mark Starowicz, executive
producer of The Journal, and worked there during the heady days
when the show was at the forefront of international
current-affairs reporting.

He travelled to war zones in Mozambique, Croatia and the Persian
Gulf with The Journal, producing work that colleagues said ranked
with the best ever done at CBC.

Robin Benger was a producer at The Journal who worked with Mr.
Cameron on a report on the civil war in the former Yugoslavia. He
said Mr. Cameron exuded a sense of calm even-handedness that
allowed him to connect with people from all sides.

"He could interview a peasant in a potato field with the same
equanimity and fairness as the president of a country," Mr. Benger
said. At one point, as shelling broke out around them while Mr.
Cameron was taping a direct-to-camera piece, he calmly worked his
way into an ad lib, describing the shell bursts as the sound of
giants dropping sandbags.

Away from the camera, Mr. Cameron was a shy and private person
who didn't covet the spotlight. He was a voracious reader who
constantly had three or four books on the go. His wife said he
would often roll out of bed clutching a book, ready to start the
day. "We have a picture of him floating on the Dead Sea, when he
was on assignment with The Journal, reading. He could read in the
most extraordinary circumstances," she said. "I think he had a
great fear of getting caught somewhere without a book in his
hand."

She said Mr. Cameron felt he always had to be prepared for any
kind of assignment, and so tried to know as much about everything
as he possibly could. "It was like being married to my own Google
search engine," she said.

And even with all the travelling his job required, he was always
very close to his family. Mr. Benger remembers his colleague, in
the middle of a war zone, being anxious to get back to the hotel
to hear how his son had fared on a math test that day.

Mr. Cameron once described a 1983 documentary he did on the civil
war in Mozambique as his best work. But it also raised doubts for
him, which he expressed in an essay for the book The Newsmakers:
Behind the Cameras with Canada's Top TV Journalists.

He wrote about feeling the dreadful suspicion "that we dip into
the surface of deep events, paddle with our feet, guard our
comforts, patronize our contacts, exploit great tragedies for the
good of our careers, and get the story wrong. . . . Maybe the
real reporter is not necessarily the most talented but the one
who can survive all this guilt, doubt, shame and suspicion, and
get at least some part of the story home."

Mr. Cameron was also one of the alternate anchors of The Journal
who shared time with the late Barbara Frum. But while Ms. Frum
was given glamorous interviews with the likes of Margaret
Thatcher, Mr. Cameron would be relegated to grilling Alan
MacEachen in the show's second half.

Mr. Starowicz described him as the "thinking-man's anchor." And
he was even given the chance to share his sense of humour in the
Journal Diary segments, which Mr. Starowicz describes as "a
cynical tour d'horizon, or Michael Moore before there was a
Michael Moore."

Mr. Cameron had been chosen to succeed Ms. Frum as host after her
death in 1992, Mr. Starowicz said, but the show was cancelled as a
result of a power struggle at the CBC. Mr. Starowicz remembers the
Journal staff gathering at a pool hall in Queen Street in Toronto
and crowding around the TV to hear Mr. Cameron utter the show's
final words: "Thank you for letting us serve you."

Mr. Cameron considered himself one of public broadcasting's true
believers, and was bitterly disappointed when he was eventually
pushed out of the network in 1999 by a take-it-or-leave-it
contract offer that promised a massive pay cut.

After having accepted assignments to host CBC's local news in
Toronto, where he won a Gemini award, and for a spell as CBC
Newsworld's morning anchor, he left the corporation for a
short-lived public-relations job with American Gem Corp.

Friends say it's a shame that Mr. Cameron never got the
recognition, or the high-profile anchor job, that he deserved.
"If he had a problem, it was that he was very bright, and
appeared that way on camera," one former Journal staffer said.

In 2003, Mr. Cameron became the media ethics chair at Ryerson
University in Toronto. It was a good fit, friends said, for he
always took seriously his responsibility to his subjects.

Mr. Henderson remembers that Mr. Cameron, before every televised
interview, carefully warned his subjects that the tape was rolling
and whatever they said could now be used against them. "He was a
guy who was always in search of fairness. He was inquisitive, as
every good journalist should be. But if he thought somebody was
treated unfairly, it really hurt him."

His latter years were spent mainly on his writing, including a
column in the National Post.

He was known as the best documentary writer in the country, and
was called in to rescue scripts on some of the CBC's
highest-profile successes.

"His writing was just superb. It lifted up anything you were
working on," Mr. Henderson, a senior producer for Canada: A
People's History, said. In 2002, Mr. Cameron directed his own
documentary The Season, chronicling the harvest in Biggar, Sask.

He also published a novel, Cat's Crossing, a dark, literary
portrait of Toronto, and before he died had finished a draft of
his second novel, which centres around a freelance travel writer.

Mr. Cameron, 62, died at his home in Toronto on Saturday, March
12, of esophageal cancer. He was surrounded by his family.

Bill Cameron was born in
Vancouver on Jan. 23, 1943.
He died of esophageal cancer
at his home in Toronto in the
early hours of Saturday morning.
He was 62. He is survived by
his wife, Cheryl Hawkes, and
their children Patrick, 22,
Rachel, 21, and Nick 15.

============= side bar =============

A TEACHER FULL OF INSIGHT AND CURIOSITY

When I walked into Bill Cameron's class at Ryersen for the first
time in the fall of 2003, I was shocked to see that my ethics
teacher wasn't just the Mr. B. Cameron listed on the timetable,
but a genuine star of the CBC. More astonishing, was that he
lacked the celebrity attitude we've all come to expect from a
star. Instead, what we got was a teacher full of insight and
curiosity.

He didn't seek the spotlight; he was respectful; and he cared
about what his students had to say. And when his class discussed
the media business, he was never condescending, despite his
wealth of experience. For someone who had been around the world
and covered many of the great conflicts of the late 20th century,
he was surprisingly interested in what a group of aspirants
thought.

Of course, there was plenty of his own wisdom as well. In a
discussion of the ethical implications of journalists carrying
weapons in war zones, he casually mentioned that he had never
thought it was a good idea. In Africa, it had once came up as an
option but he dismissed it.

He thought that any interview conducted by someone holding a
lethal weapon was probably compromised.

I once approached him to ask about the ethics of going undercover
to expose a professional essay-writing service used by university
students. Bill discussed how it could be done in the most honest,
straightforward way. He was adamant that the owners of the service
could be persuaded to tell their side of the story, and eventually
they did.

On the morning the story was published, Bill had already
carefully read the student paper by the time I arrived. He said
he thought we had got the ethics just right.

It was a compliment I will always treasure. -- Joe Friesen
-------------------------------------------------------------------
Jim Jaworski
2005-03-17 08:08:21 UTC
Post by Bobcat
Bill Cameron, the long-time CBC TV journalists who started in CBC Radio died
late last night of esophageal cancer, following long periods of "brutal
chemotherapy", according to a story in today's Globe and Mail. You need a
password, so here's the item in its entirety.
Saturday, March 12, 2005 Updated at 10:46 AM EST
Canadian Press
Toronto - Bill Cameron, the intellectually challenging and erudite broadcast
journalist who had a celebrated parting of the ways with CBC Television in
the wake of 1999 budget cuts, is dead.
He died around midnight Friday of cancer of the esophagus which had moved
into his brain and liver despite rounds of brutal chemotherapy, a CBC
spokeswoman said.
Is cancer of the esophagus caused by smoking tobacco?

Jim
Dan Say
2005-03-17 21:31:15 UTC
Post by Jim Jaworski
Post by Bobcat
Bill Cameron, the long-time CBC TV journalists who started in CBC Radio died
late last night of esophageal cancer, following long periods of "brutal
chemotherapy", according to a story in today's Globe and Mail. You need a
password, so here's the item in its entirety.
Saturday, March 12, 2005 Updated at 10:46 AM EST
Canadian Press
Toronto - Bill Cameron, the intellectually challenging and erudite broadcast
journalist who had a celebrated parting of the ways with CBC Television in
the wake of 1999 budget cuts, is dead.
He died around midnight Friday of cancer of the esophagus which had moved
into his brain and liver despite rounds of brutal chemotherapy, a CBC
spokeswoman said.
Is cancer of the esophagus caused by smoking tobacco?
Jim
-----------
Or pickles, or polluted air. Quite common in China.
The chemicals are carcinogenic forms of benzenes
and prolonged exposure is associated with them.

Doesn't have to be smoking.